Archive for the Blue Green Algae Category

Put-In Bay – an all inclusive day on the Lake!

Put-In-Bay A Day on the Lake September 20, 2013 2013 Bus trip Brochure This is a very fun and educational bus trip to Put-in-Bay, where we will be treated to a tour of the newly-remodeled Ohio State University Water Quality Lab. After the tour we will then board the research vessels for an informative, hands-on cruise of Lake Erie. You will also have the opportunity to explore and enjoy lunch on the island. This is an opportunity for Ag Retailers, Producers and concerned Citizens to learn about the ongoing research at OSU’s Stone Lab. These programs & projects are helping to identify the causes of the harmful algal blooms and invasive species in Lake Erie. Phosphorus fertilizer is the limiting factor in the proliferation of the algae $20 / person Please send check to : Allen SWCD 3718 New Vision Drive Fort Wayne, IN 46845 Contact us: 260-484-5848 ext. 3 Or Email us at Krista.Voors@IN.nacdnet.net 6:15 AM Board Bus at Meijer 10301 SR 37, Ft. Wayne,IN 46835 * Juice and rolls served * 6:30 AM Bus departs from Meijer 9:30 AM Depart Catawba Island via Miller Ferry to Put-In-Bay 5174 E. Water St., Port Clinton, OH 43452 10:00 AM Island

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Rivers Causing Illness to Recreationists

Hello All, I spoke to Julie Horney today and she gave me a different perspective about our efforts.  Julie became ill with Hepatitis, Thrombocytopenia,  hepatomegaly (eventually causing Anemia) – probably due to E. coli – within 24 hours of her contact with our rivers.  There needs to be a face that represents the problems we face with our river conditions…enough to cause illness! Her contact with the water is causing her weakness and sickness months later, and still to this day ~ no medication to help, only living through the illness she contracted due to contact with our local waterways!  So who is is the responsible party for her illnesses? City? County? DNR? Julie wants postings at all entry points to waterways; as to the hazards of using the waterways for recreation.  I wanted to share her story with you.  ALL of us need to be aware of the dangers of our local waterways!  If you think that our rivers in Indiana are disgusting, your natural resources are being robbed from you.  Thank you for reading her story!   ~ Abby   Baby don’t fear the . . . cyanobacteria!    If the “wind, the summer, the rain” were present that

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HEC's Environmental Policy for Waterways in 2011

Hoosier Environmental Council 2011-2012 Legislative Policy Guide http://www.hecweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/2011LegGuide10-3.pdf According to the 2010 Impaired Waters List, Indiana has more than 2,600 impaired waters that are unsafe for drinking and recreation. The following is a summary of information presented in the guide regarding water issues: Issue 1) Restriction unnecessary use of phosphorus in lawn fertilizers on turf grass unless it is TRULY needed.  This is the first issue discussed because lawn fertilizer has been linked to “dead zones” in Lake Erie, where over 50% of our fish from the Great Lakes come from! (pg 4) Issue 2) The Clean Water Act’s Anti-Degradation Policy was adopted by the Indiana General Assembly, but IDEM’s proposed rules do not meet this standard and must be improved.  Too many exemptions allow companies to avoid justifying their new or increased discharges.  There are several weaknesses in proposed rule so it needs to be strengthened. (pg 4) Issue 3) Confined Feeding Animal Operations (CAFO’s) in Indiana number over 3,000.  At 80% of these operations; hogs and dairy cows are confined by the thousands or chickens are raised by tens of thousands at a single facility.   These large scale operations lead to public health disasters like fish kills, and Salmonella tainted eggs, blue-green algae blooms.

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Top Shoreline/Streambank Tips

1. Grow a Greenbelt: Establish a greenbelt or expand an existing one by adding more native plants.  Encourage your neighbors to do the same.  Buffers are helpful when it comes to water quality! 2. Fertilizer Smart: If you fertilize, refrain from fertilizing within 30′ of a shoreline/ditch/stream. DEFINITELY use no-phosphorus fertilizer. 3. Leave Trees: If a tree falls into the water leave it! They provide great habitat and contribute to the important carbon budget of the ecosystem. 4. Maintain Septic Systems: Failing septic systems can leach nutrients, which cause nuisance algae and plant growth. 5. Control Erosion: Stabilize shoreline erosion with bioengineering methods best management practices. 6. Join Forces: Support your local lake or river associations; they implement important resources protection projects and programs…like Save Maumee! 7. Stow Away: Store boats, boat hoists, docks and other equipment away from the shoreline; they can harm shoreline plants and compact soils.  Work on these machines and engines AWAY from the water to reduce leaks and spills. 8. Flow Away: Stormwater from driveways, roof tops, and other surfaces carries harmful pollutants.  Direct stormwater away from the street grates and allow it to infiltrate into the ground. (i.e. raingardens, rainbarrels, porous cement, wash car

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How does planting trees and grasses help?

     Siltation/erosion/sedimentation is the #1 pollutant in our watershed.  The grasses will help to settle out suspended sediment in the water to help hold down the soil that could be washed away because there is nothing to hold down the barren soil when the water comes rushing down during a rain event.        Grasses filtrate sediment by holding water for a longer period of time so the sediment settles to the bottom instead of traveling downstream.        Removal of nutrients from the water before it passes downstream.          Plants produce enzymes which will absorb and “eat” bacteria         Natural removal of chemical pollutants like fertilizers and waste materials removes nitrogen, phosphorous and toxins from surface water.         Creating more shade will help to create Dissolved Oxygen that is needed in the water for fish and other wildlife to “breathe.”         Floods problems can be alleviated – grassy knolls and trees can capture, store and slowly release water over a longer period of time         Protect shorelines through reduction of destructive energy from fast moving/ rising water         Alleviate pools of standing, stagnant water so West Nile will not have the opportunity to

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Interesting Find of the Day

I had Sandy Bihn from the Western Lake Erie Basin call and ask me what was happening upstream, “There are major problems in Western Lake Erie, we are having algae blooms comparable to the early 1980’s [just after the Clean Water Act became enforceable law].  Maumee Bay in this area is the outlet to the Maumee. If you are interested in visiting this area, ask questions and see for yourself; the tour is  September 4th – Maumee Bay Tour – take a bus to Toledo, Ohio’s Maumee Bay and find out about the sediment load being deposited and removed from your waterways – call Jason Roehrig for interest or reservations (419) 782-8751 Greg Konger recommend I read the college textbook, “Living in the Environment/Fourteenth Edition” by G. Tyler Miller, Jr.  It explains our environmental condition clearly with an attention to details. In this book, it states the harmful affects of artificial light. Here is the exerpt: “Wesley College professor Marianne Moore and her colleagues have found evidence that artificial illumination can alter aquatic ecosystems and could ultimately decrease water quality. Minute zooplankton avoid predators by remaining well below the surface during the day and then rising to graze on algae

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