Archive for the IN affects Great Lakes Category

OPPOSE SB398 – appeals state regulated wetland laws

OPPOSE SB398 – appeals state regulated wetland laws
Update: February 2, 2021 - SB389 passed in the State Senate and is headed to the House. Call today to tell your Indiana House Representatives NO on SB 389! Here’s what happens: Call (317) 232-9600 to get the Indiana House of Representatives switchboard. Tell the operator you want to leave a message for your rep regarding a bill. If you don’t know your rep they can likely look it up. (When they answer the phone they usually know your name due to caller ID). IF you want to know your representative check out this website: http://iga.in.gov/legislative/find-legislators/ They will ask you what bill. You say SB 389. They will say: Support or oppose? You say Oppose. Or if you’re me you say something *slightly* more emphatic but they only record “oppose.” They say “Your comment has been recorded.” You say “Thank you.” The entire process takes 1 minute. PRO TIP: Save this number in your phone under your State Senator contact card so you never have to look it up again and it becomes the easiest call you’ll ever make! Please call today!! FEB 1, 2021 UPDATE: SB 389 passed in the Indiana Senate, and is now headed to the Indiana House.Read more

Fort Wayne Parks and Recreation Survey Comments

The Fort Wayne Parks and Recreation Department is conducting a Community Needs Assessment Survey   The Survey is being conducted to gather crucial feedback about parks, facilities and programs offered to Fort Wayne citizens. A randomly selected group of citizens will receive or have already received a questionnaire in the mail, which can be completed and mailed back in an included postage-paid envelope, or can be completed online following included instructions. To ensure a comprehensive result, those who received Needs Assessment questionnaires are encouraged to complete the survey, even if they do not use most or any Parks and Recreation services. Citizen feedback is vital to the strategic planning efforts of the Fort Wayne Parks and Recreation Department, and citizens can participate even if they did not receive a survey in the mail. Save Maumee is requesting you share feedback on this survey by clicking on this link: https://confidential-survey.com/datafile/fortwayneserved1.htm Here are a few comments submitted, regarding the survey. CLICK TO READ SAVE MAUMEE’S ENTIRE COMMENTS HERE Read more

MAP: Specific differentiation between Mississippi Basin & Great Lakes Basin

From the document: Wabash – Maumee Connection Site Visit Field Report July 27, 2010  Prepared For: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Great Lakes National Program Office  Click to access Wabash-Maumee-Field-Report_Final_small.pdf “Of primary concern are the Silver and Bighead carp which have been expanding their habitats within the Mississippi River basin for at least the past twenty years where they have decimated native fish populations by as much as 97 percent in some areas. These fish are currently threatening to enter the Great Lakes, a valuable fresh water resource.”   THIS is the specific location they are able to cross from the Mississippi via the Wabash to the Great Lakes via the St. Marys/Maumee. “Asian carp have been known to exist within the Wabash River for nearly 20 years. However, in May 2010 Indiana DNR observed Asian Carp eggs and spawning behavior much further upstream on the Wabash than was previously anticipated. The Wabash River was a “dead‐ end” for these fish as the Roush Dam prevents Asian carp from reaching the headwaters of the Wabash River. However, the Little River connects to the Wabash below the dam and its headwaters ebb into marshland on the southwestern edge of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Due

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Purdue Publication RE: Allen County/Indiana Watersheds

  8 pages of solid information CLICK HERE: Great Lakes Watershed / Allen County, Indiana  

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Put-In Bay – an all inclusive day on the Lake!

Put-In-Bay A Day on the Lake September 20, 2013 2013 Bus trip Brochure This is a very fun and educational bus trip to Put-in-Bay, where we will be treated to a tour of the newly-remodeled Ohio State University Water Quality Lab. After the tour we will then board the research vessels for an informative, hands-on cruise of Lake Erie. You will also have the opportunity to explore and enjoy lunch on the island. This is an opportunity for Ag Retailers, Producers and concerned Citizens to learn about the ongoing research at OSU’s Stone Lab. These programs & projects are helping to identify the causes of the harmful algal blooms and invasive species in Lake Erie. Phosphorus fertilizer is the limiting factor in the proliferation of the algae $20 / person Please send check to : Allen SWCD 3718 New Vision Drive Fort Wayne, IN 46845 Contact us: 260-484-5848 ext. 3 Or Email us at Krista.Voors@IN.nacdnet.net 6:15 AM Board Bus at Meijer 10301 SR 37, Ft. Wayne,IN 46835 * Juice and rolls served * 6:30 AM Bus departs from Meijer 9:30 AM Depart Catawba Island via Miller Ferry to Put-In-Bay 5174 E. Water St., Port Clinton, OH 43452 10:00 AM Island

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IPFW Environmental Conservation Class-Field work with Save Maumee

Dr. Jordan Marshall – IPFW Environmental Conservation Class Monday October 15, 2012 1:30– 2:30pm Location: St. Joseph and St. Marys converge into the headwaters of the Maumee River – .7 miles downstream easterly Hosey Dam (at N. Anthony Bridge) North bank of the Maumee River; (floodway/spillway- direct middle) sand, loam, clay, river sediment NUMBER OF VOLUNTEER PARTICIPANTS – 24 Save Maumee Programing Project with IPFW Environmental Conservation Class In-kind student volunteers completed restoration project CLICK HERE FOR PICTURES In the floodway we planted 4 Pin Oak, 2 Mulberry, 2 River Birch, and one Hornbeam and 30 Oak Acorns into the stretch of river where Save Maumee conducts the majority of conservation projects.  As a group today, we also planted native DNR approved seeds; Big Blue Stem, Indian Grass, Switchgrass, New England Aster, Grass Leaved Goldenrod, Prairie Dock, Virginia Mountain Mint, Ironweed, Purple Coneflower, Monarda, and Black Eyed Susan and a few unidentified sedges.  We installed the seed blend under 19 feet of coconut mesh, called erosion-control-mats or GeoJute.  GeoJute is made from coconut fiber that will completely disintegrate in approximately 5 years. The coconut mesh is to hold down new life as the water raises and flows over the floodway. Dr.

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Steering Committee Chair Discusses Levee Maintenance

Save Maumee wants to talk openly with city officials, and with the taxpayers, about our waterways and the cause & effect of current practices relating to land use and water quality. The water we speak of is the same water we drink, bathe our children in, water our gardens with, and live alongside. It is our greatest natural resource. Recently, the city hired a tree service to remove vegetation along the Niagara Levee (the same area Save Maumee has been repairing since 2005) for a levee inspection in December 2012. Conversations with Flood Control Supervisor Cathy Burleson revealed that the Army Corps of Engineers required much of this removal in their levee regulations that came as a result of Hurricane Katrina. She stated that she did not want to cut the trees down, ACE regulations required her to do so. Burleson also mentioned that there are 10.5 miles of levees that the City of Fort Wayne, Board of Public Works, are responsible for maintaining. Walk the River Greenway along Edgewater Avenue or Spy Run and you can see that definition of maintenance ~ removal of all trees and vegetation with the installation of rip rap. One small portion of Edgewater was developed

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Stewards of the Three Rivers of Fort Wayne

Abstract Stewards of the Three Rivers of Fort Wayne: By Rhonda Ladig Moxter The Interaction of Government, Quasigovernment, and Nonprofit Organizations In the pageant The Glorious Gateway of the West (Rice, 1916) celebrating the centennial of the state of Indiana, the prologue of the first scene discusses the magic that the three rivers of present day Fort Wayne meant to the native people.  In the prologue the pageant opens with a native musing, “Sacred this place.  For untold ages, long lost in the nameless years, my people came with ancient rites where these three rivers run under the shining sky” (p. 19).   Since the time before Fort Wayne was a city, with native peoples and settlers, the three rivers have been fought over as a source of food, water, transportation, business, and agriculture.  The battle over these rivers continues today, and the topics have changed surprisingly little.  But, though the circumstances have changed and the fight is just as passionate.  Many groups and organizations have an interest in the health and well-being of Fort Wayne’s three famous waterways.  Local government plays a huge role in the decisions over how the waters of our river can be used by businesses and

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Rivers Causing Illness to Recreationists

Hello All, I spoke to Julie Horney today and she gave me a different perspective about our efforts.  Julie became ill with Hepatitis, Thrombocytopenia,  hepatomegaly (eventually causing Anemia) – probably due to E. coli – within 24 hours of her contact with our rivers.  There needs to be a face that represents the problems we face with our river conditions…enough to cause illness! Her contact with the water is causing her weakness and sickness months later, and still to this day ~ no medication to help, only living through the illness she contracted due to contact with our local waterways!  So who is is the responsible party for her illnesses? City? County? DNR? Julie wants postings at all entry points to waterways; as to the hazards of using the waterways for recreation.  I wanted to share her story with you.  ALL of us need to be aware of the dangers of our local waterways!  If you think that our rivers in Indiana are disgusting, your natural resources are being robbed from you.  Thank you for reading her story!   ~ Abby   Baby don’t fear the . . . cyanobacteria!    If the “wind, the summer, the rain” were present that

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Killing waterways won't revive the economy

Toledo Blade Sunday, January 15, 2012 COMMENTARY BY KRISTY MEYER Some of our members of Congress evidently need a refresher course in clean water. From the mid-1800s to the late 1960s, many rivers in the United States — including Ohio’s Cuyahoga River — caught fire because of uncontrolled dumping of pollution. In the 1930s, algae blooms became a nuisance in the Great Lakes. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources concluded in 1953 that “long periods of pollution barriers to fish existed in the form of toxic material or deficient oxygen.” In the 1960s and 1970s, scientists declared Lake Erie biologically dead. As a result, the U.S. and Canadian governments passed two historic pieces of legislation: the federal Clean Water Act and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Our lakes and rivers rebounded. People flocked to Lake Erie and other waterways to fish, swim, and boat. Small businesses that depended on the lake’s fishery and water-based recreation flourished. The number of coastal marine businesses along Lake Erie’s coast has more than doubled, from 207 in 1977 to 425 today. In 1975, there were 34 charter boat captains. Today, there are about 800 of these small-business owners. The take-home message: Clean water

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Save Maumee Grassroots Org. wins "Organization of the Year Award"

Awards Ceremony at The 4th Annual Greening the Statehouse Policy Forum will be held on Saturday, December 10th at Butler University’s Reilly Room at Atherton Union in downtown Indy from 8:30am-3pm.  So join us for education from Indianapolis policy experts and environmental groups. For reservations call Jesse Karbanda at 317.685.8800 ext. 103 The Hoosier Environmental Council, Indiana’s largest environmental policy organization, has claimed “Save Maumee won Organization of the Year!”  Abigail King, Ryan Bailey and Jain Young will be accepting the award for the group. Supporters of the day include Sierra Club, Blue Green Alliance, Carmel Green Initiative, Indiana Green Business Network, Indiana Recycling Coalition, Indiana Wildlife Federation, Save the Dunes, City of Indianapolis-Office of Sustainability. Save Maumee has been chosen as a result of the positive impact on the community, the group’s great volunteer spirit, passion for the health of the rivers in the Great Lakes region, and ability to organize a number of very successful volunteer driven river clean-up and restoration events. Northeast Indiana Rivers Represented in Washington D.C. Save Maumee has been chosen by Healing Our Waters to represent Northeast Indiana for Clean Water Week during Great Lakes Days in Washington, D.C. The event will be held

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IDEM Public Comment Letter for Steel Dynamics Inc. new copper plant

September 19, 2011 This letter is to be included for the public comment period on SDI LaFarga, LLC’s air permit #003-30250-00384 We believe there is a compliance violation with Steel Dynamics’ operation at Superior Aluminum located on 14214 Edgerton rd. (326 IAC 6-4 Rule on Fugitive Dust).  We can provide video evidence to both the EPA and IDEM to prove the need for an investigation.  IDEM referred us to information about current and expected air pollution levels at http://www.in.gov/apps/idem/smog/ and directed us towards a map of the air quality monitors around the area. After digging for a time, I was unable to locate a map that showed anything but the monitors around nation. It is difficult to tell if the ones in our area are located in Allen County, IN.  Our area of concern is around Edgerton, Ryan, Dawkins, Bruick, Harper, Roussey, Bremer, Berthauld, Webster, Parent, Slusher Roads, and US 24.   In the 326 IAC 2-1.1-5 it reads. The commissioner shall not issue a registration, permit, modification approval, or operating permit revision: (1)   would allow a source to cause or contribute to a violation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards; (2)   would allow a violation of a PSD

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Citizens' Questions that NEED to be Answered

On September 15th, 2011 IDEM held a public meeting to address the air permits being issued for Steel Dynamics Inc. 59 people were in attendance and spoke of fear of pollution from Superior Aluminum, and did not want to have air permits approved for the new LaFarga copper plant. We have included the questions (below are citizens’ questions) that were NOT answered during this 4 hour meeting and we are requesting they are answered for the health of the public OR deny SDI’s air permit request.  AIR Who will watchdog any monitors that are placed? How often will they be monitored? (heavy metals, particulate matter, ) How are we to be assured that SDI will conform to the Federal Clean Air Act?   If these regulations are not followed, what is the consequence to the business? What fines are associated with non-compliance? public hearing/ legal action / law suit applicable? If a fine were levied, where would the money go? Can we test the air now BEFORE this plant goes up and then AFTER the plant is in operation if air permit is granted? (benchmark) If there is something in existence of what is upwind and downwind to monitor the

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U.S. Army helps Save the Maumee!

July 16th 2011– United States National Guard helped Save the Maumee River! Lead by Staff Sergeant Grimm and Sergeant Michele Berkes-Adams along with a medic and 20 recruits removed large items in the Maumee River in Riverhaven, (a three mile stretch between Fort Wayne and New Haven). – The U.S. Army works on “green drills” several times a year and had chosen to help Save Maumee!  Items removed include a teddy bear, 10 tires and assorted car parts, steel drums, a sump pump, 2 children pools. Hats off to the men and women who keep us safe through cleaning up the large items that nobody else can remove without being put in harms way! Canoes were provided by Fort Wayne Outfitters/Bike Depot and Earth Adventures; two competitors working together to improve our rivers.   Here are two seperate stories from the Journal Gazette! http://www.journalgazette.net/article/20110717/LOCAL/307179893/1002/LOCAL Troops attack Maumee trash Published: July 17, 2011 3:00 a.m. Patrick Svitek | The Journal Gazette Fort Wayne– Ten tires, two kiddie pools, a sump pump, a microwave and a doll head were among items collected by Staff Sgt. David Grimm’s Indiana Army National Guard team Saturday afternoon in the Maumee River. As part of the National Guard’s nationwide

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Botulism Report of Dead Birds still relevent

From the Emmet County Lakeshore Association Fall 2010 Newsletter: During the fall of 2007 there was an estimated 8,000 – 10,000 water birds that were believed to have died from botulism poisoning along the northern Lake Michigan shoreline.  These water birds included loons, gulls, and all ducks, local and migratory in Lake Michigan.   There is the chain of events leading up to the botulism toxin poisoning of sea birds: 1) Botulism is naturally occurring on the lake bottom. 2) Mats of Cladophora algae (the same algae that is thick along the Lake Michigan beach) are believed to be caused by clearer water, caused by the invasive zebra and quagga mussels’ filtration of plankton from the water and from the mussels’ excretions causing the fertilization of the algae.  These mats create an anaerobic condition on the lake floor which causes the botulism to produce a toxin. 3) The toxin is ingested by the mussels. 4) The invasive mussels are then eaten by the invasive round goby fish. 5) The dead round goby fish float to the surface and are eaten by sea birds. 6) The toxin causes a paralysis and the birds die from drowning or exposure. This past Summer

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6th Annual Save Maumee's EARTH DAY FUNNY VIDEO!

Well, we are considered a good natured bunch, with a sense of humor… See our attempts at getting some nationwide attention!  We gave a funny shout out to Ellen DeGeneres, John Stewart, Jimmy Kimmel, Steven Colbert & Oprah.  We figured any media attention is good attention, even if it is a little tainted!  We think that all the trash we pull out of our Three Rivers in Fort Wayne is ridiculous and wanted to share a little satire in our Earth Day efforts.  We have been accused of being “rough around the edges and a little crass,” so we did not want to disappoint!  Remember, we are a 100% unpaid volunteer group, so you get what you pay for!  Dirty rivers, however, are no laughing matter.  Let it be very clear though, we only want clean water, clean rivers and reduced pollution and we are willing to do something about it.  It is one thing that brings us all to a consensus.  Thank you for your continued support! Thank you to everyone who make our events a complete success….AGAIN! The first 30 seconds are specific to the celebrity, and the rest of the 2 minute video are basically the same.

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More Trees Removed Along Riverbanks?

VIDEO AND COVERAGE HERE: Levee Tree Removal in Fort Wayne It has recently come to the attention of Save Maumee that trees along the Maumee River and St. Mary’s River are indiscriminately being cut down by order of the Board of Public Works by orders of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  Apparently, this area of the riverbank lies on a levee and during one of the last big floods in Fort Wayne, the riverbank and the trees fell into the water.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is in charge of regulating levees by setting the safety guidelines and according to city planners, the US ACE directed the city to “remove the trees and make repairs or lose the acceptable rating of flood protection.”  This has resulted in the removal of hundreds of trees along the riverbanks of the Maumee River – in addition to trees removed from the St. Mary’s and St. Joe Rivers as well. Straight from the Board Of Public Works “Officials in Fort Wayne say there should be no trees cut down along the city’s flood levees because there aren’t any. The levees here were built by the corps in the 1990s, and the only

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HEC's Environmental Policy for Waterways in 2011

Hoosier Environmental Council 2011-2012 Legislative Policy Guide http://www.hecweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/2011LegGuide10-3.pdf According to the 2010 Impaired Waters List, Indiana has more than 2,600 impaired waters that are unsafe for drinking and recreation. The following is a summary of information presented in the guide regarding water issues: Issue 1) Restriction unnecessary use of phosphorus in lawn fertilizers on turf grass unless it is TRULY needed.  This is the first issue discussed because lawn fertilizer has been linked to “dead zones” in Lake Erie, where over 50% of our fish from the Great Lakes come from! (pg 4) Issue 2) The Clean Water Act’s Anti-Degradation Policy was adopted by the Indiana General Assembly, but IDEM’s proposed rules do not meet this standard and must be improved.  Too many exemptions allow companies to avoid justifying their new or increased discharges.  There are several weaknesses in proposed rule so it needs to be strengthened. (pg 4) Issue 3) Confined Feeding Animal Operations (CAFO’s) in Indiana number over 3,000.  At 80% of these operations; hogs and dairy cows are confined by the thousands or chickens are raised by tens of thousands at a single facility.   These large scale operations lead to public health disasters like fish kills, and Salmonella tainted eggs, blue-green algae blooms.

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Top Shoreline/Streambank Tips

1. Grow a Greenbelt: Establish a greenbelt or expand an existing one by adding more native plants.  Encourage your neighbors to do the same.  Buffers are helpful when it comes to water quality! 2. Fertilizer Smart: If you fertilize, refrain from fertilizing within 30′ of a shoreline/ditch/stream. DEFINITELY use no-phosphorus fertilizer. 3. Leave Trees: If a tree falls into the water leave it! They provide great habitat and contribute to the important carbon budget of the ecosystem. 4. Maintain Septic Systems: Failing septic systems can leach nutrients, which cause nuisance algae and plant growth. 5. Control Erosion: Stabilize shoreline erosion with bioengineering methods best management practices. 6. Join Forces: Support your local lake or river associations; they implement important resources protection projects and programs…like Save Maumee! 7. Stow Away: Store boats, boat hoists, docks and other equipment away from the shoreline; they can harm shoreline plants and compact soils.  Work on these machines and engines AWAY from the water to reduce leaks and spills. 8. Flow Away: Stormwater from driveways, roof tops, and other surfaces carries harmful pollutants.  Direct stormwater away from the street grates and allow it to infiltrate into the ground. (i.e. raingardens, rainbarrels, porous cement, wash car

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Day at the Maumee Bay / Lake Erie

The following is information the Erie Port Authority passed out to participants attending “A Day at the Bay” hosted by the  Upper Maumee Watershed Partnership.  Maumee River: Largest body of water emptying into the Great Lakes 150 miles long Shares water with the St. Marys River, St. Joseph River, Auglaize River, Little Auglaize River, Blanchard River, Tiffen River, Ottowa River Maumee Watershed: 6,586 sqare miles in Indiana, Ohio & Michigan 4,000 miles of streams Drains 4 million acres 1.7 million people live in the watershed 327 named streams Supports 94 species of fish 90% of Ohio’s wetlands have been drained or filled in

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Great Lakes states’ 500 square miles of parking lots threaten water quality, walkability

http://greatlakesecho.org/2010/06/17/great-lakes-states-500-square-miles-of-parking-lots-threaten-water-quality-walkability/       Great Lakes Echo –  June 17, 2010 People ask me all the time about CSO’s / SSO’s (Combined  Sewer Overflow / Sanitary Sewer Outfalls).  Did the city plan poorly for our sewers? Why would 1/12th of an inch of rain cause all of our toilets and sinks water and stormsewers mix and discharge directly into the rivers, if the city/county were not to blame?  The answer is not that complicated like many others these days.  However, solutions are very expensive. When Fort Wayne infrastructure was built around 1912 for our sanitary sewers (toilets) and stormsewers (the grates on the streets) they were two separate systems that were connected, toward the top, by a single pipe.  The sanitary sewers have a constant flow, the storm sewers surge with rain.  Since they are connected at the top with a smaller pipe, the mix of both pipes are released from the “outfall points.”  This pipe is a fail-safe type system, so when large rain events or flooding occurred, it would discharge into the waterways instead of coming up in your house.  This is not a bad idea, considering I am a homeowner as well.  SO ~ when built all those many years

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