Archive for the Plants/Trees and Sustainable Planting Category

Rose Ave. Rehabilitation

Rose Ave. Rehabilitation
Save Maumee’s Work Site 2021 501 Rose Ave. New Haven, IN 46774 Rose Ave Specification Plan Implemented in 2020 thanks to Great Lakes Restoration Grant through the USDA Forest Service October 18, 2020 Completed planting over 3 days Added 550 trees (25% shrubs & 75% trees) 1,400 linear feet by 64 feet wide of invasive removal (>square feet) & large trash removal of historic rubbish This is a private property site, but we are inviting you to come help make it better with us on event days! DO NOT DRIVE OR PARK ON THE HILL Please leave only footprints and take only TRASH. Stay on the paths Do not move wood, stones, plants/trees, wildlife and please be respectful. IDEM update Sept 1 2020: water testing & regulatory correspondence  IDEM update 2020 December: site photos & maps Trier and Bullerman converging HUC12 Watershed Map CLICK HERE FOR ALL SAVE MAUMEE’S UPCOMING EVENTS   See the pictures from: 2020 October 3-Day Tree Planting of 550 trees at Rose Ave. 2020 Earth Day Trash Clean Up at Rose Ave Please click to fill out Please sign the LIABILITY WAIVER PDF CLICK HERE TO EMAIL IT! Our projects heart & soul is in ourRead more

RiverFest at IPFW – Save Maumee Represented

Presentation: June 22, 2013  10:30AM – 11AM Title: What can we do to make our 3 Rivers better; In-depth thought into surface water Director, Abigail King said SMGO will release their new initiatives at RiverFest, that will “draw many eyes to the importance of water quality.” “We plan to demonstrate the symbiotic relationship between stream health and how it is directly related to human health and recreation.” By: Abigail King, Save Maumee Grassroots Organization Director & Founder Secretary of Heartland Communities Inc. (Save Maumee’s nonprofit 501C3 fiscal sponsor) Upper Maumee Watershed Partnership Treasurer Maumee Valley Heritage Corridor; Region I Environmental Consultant ACTIVE PRESENTATION FOR RIVERFEST ATTENDEES: Save Maumee Grassroots Organization will be passing out native riverbank seed & chaff in salvaged reusable cotton-cloth bags at RiverFest.  SMGO wants these diverse and desirable contents to be planted on any local streambank. Directions on the bag include, “if you want these seeds to grow, and work to improve water quality; only plant where nothing green grows, dirt is exposed, near an open water source, in an area that will NOT be mowed.  Then STOMP the seeds down flat with your shoes, flattening the open soil down, so it does not float away during

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IPFW Environmental Conservation Class-Field work with Save Maumee

Dr. Jordan Marshall – IPFW Environmental Conservation Class Monday October 15, 2012 1:30– 2:30pm Location: St. Joseph and St. Marys converge into the headwaters of the Maumee River – .7 miles downstream easterly Hosey Dam (at N. Anthony Bridge) North bank of the Maumee River; (floodway/spillway- direct middle) sand, loam, clay, river sediment NUMBER OF VOLUNTEER PARTICIPANTS – 24 Save Maumee Programing Project with IPFW Environmental Conservation Class In-kind student volunteers completed restoration project CLICK HERE FOR PICTURES In the floodway we planted 4 Pin Oak, 2 Mulberry, 2 River Birch, and one Hornbeam and 30 Oak Acorns into the stretch of river where Save Maumee conducts the majority of conservation projects.  As a group today, we also planted native DNR approved seeds; Big Blue Stem, Indian Grass, Switchgrass, New England Aster, Grass Leaved Goldenrod, Prairie Dock, Virginia Mountain Mint, Ironweed, Purple Coneflower, Monarda, and Black Eyed Susan and a few unidentified sedges.  We installed the seed blend under 19 feet of coconut mesh, called erosion-control-mats or GeoJute.  GeoJute is made from coconut fiber that will completely disintegrate in approximately 5 years. The coconut mesh is to hold down new life as the water raises and flows over the floodway. Dr.

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Save Maumee Earth Day 2012 ~ 7th Annual Celebration

INVITATION Sunday April 22, 2012 11am-4pm Come to our Open-Non-House! Plant trees, seed, plant plugs, install erosion control mats and remove garbage on the banks of the Maumee when you have an hour or five to spare, rally for clean water, support your local waterways…and have fun doing it with live entertainment! Cleansing the riverbanks of garbage 11am – 4pm  – You won’t be able to miss it meet us at the big tent! LOCATION: On the corner of N. Anthony Blvd. and Niagara Dr. We will meet here: View Larger MapPEOPLE WITH TRUCKS BE HERE AT NOON! – We will be sending you to remote sites for clean-up of other river areas! WHAT TIME exactly are things happening?  Well, the day rolls out like a rushing river so here is a general guide to events…. 11am – I.C. Coldwater will present on water quality locally 11am – 3:30pm – Silent Auction (see items for bid below) 11am-4pm     Education & Displays all day  (see time sheet at INFO table when you arrive) NOON – Bring your trucks meet at the dumpster for remote site clean-up In 2012 we plan to remove trash from streams and waterways from Eagle Marsh to

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2011 Tribute to our local Rivers

We wanted to commemorate our achievements for Save Maumee’s “Organization of the Year 2011” presented to us at Butler University by Hoosier Environmental Council. So, if you would like to see why we were chosen for the award, check out our video with local musicians Elephants in Mud. ALL pictures in the video were taken in 2011 ~ Click on the picture!

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Invasives: What are they and why do we care?

An “invasive plant” is another name for a plant which grows quickly and aggressively, displacing other plants as it spreads and harming diversity of other plants.  Usually invasive plants are not native to North America.  Of the roughly 2,300 plant species growing outside cultivation in Indiana, 25% are non-native. Most non-natives cause little trouble, but a few aggressive species are responsible for degrading and destroying thousands of acres of natural plant communities in Indiana and are costing hundreds of thousands of dollars each year in control measures.  Some of these invasives are still being sold by nurseries and well meaning Hoosiers – not realizing the damage it can cause.  There are MANY natives discussed in previous posts. Why do we care? Invasive plants hurt wildlife by eliminating the plants our native animals need for food and cover.  The invasives compete with nativeplants for sunlight, space and/or soil nutrients. Invasive plants destroy habitat for rare wildflowers and animals; they threaten 2/3rds of all endangered species. Invasive plants cost money.  Agencies around Indiana spend hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to eradicate these species and protect our natural areas. Each year the cost grows. Agriculture losses and control costs due to

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Information from Earth Day Happenings…Update to follow soon!

Save Maumee’s 6th Annual  EARTH DAY 2011 Celebration! Coordinated by Save Maumee Grassroots Organization           Safety Sheet – Please take a moment now and read! o       DO NOT PICK UP ANY BOTTLES CONNECTED TO A TUBE: IT MAYBE     A  METH-LAB *DO NOT TOUCH*DANGER*Find someone in a Save Maumee shirt. o        Go on your walk with a buddy so you can help and watch each other! o        Do not walk on unstable stream banks, disturbing these banks-including the vegetation growing upon them-can accelerate erosion and lead to a collapse.  Some of the plants you step on may have been planted by another participant! Be part of the solution, not part of the problem! NO STEPPING ON PLANTS. o       Don’t pick up any hypodermic needles, or other medical or hazardous waste or animal carcasses’ or manure but please notify someone to dispose of anything in question.  DO NOT TOUCH DEAD BIRDS. (bird flu & notify someone) o       We only want adults picking up sharp objects like glass because we do not want any children handling anything on which they may accidentally cut themselves. Adequate adult supervision is required at all times for anyone under 18!                                    **DO NOT LEAVE YOUR

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More Trees Removed Along Riverbanks?

VIDEO AND COVERAGE HERE: Levee Tree Removal in Fort Wayne It has recently come to the attention of Save Maumee that trees along the Maumee River and St. Mary’s River are indiscriminately being cut down by order of the Board of Public Works by orders of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  Apparently, this area of the riverbank lies on a levee and during one of the last big floods in Fort Wayne, the riverbank and the trees fell into the water.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is in charge of regulating levees by setting the safety guidelines and according to city planners, the US ACE directed the city to “remove the trees and make repairs or lose the acceptable rating of flood protection.”  This has resulted in the removal of hundreds of trees along the riverbanks of the Maumee River – in addition to trees removed from the St. Mary’s and St. Joe Rivers as well. Straight from the Board Of Public Works “Officials in Fort Wayne say there should be no trees cut down along the city’s flood levees because there aren’t any. The levees here were built by the corps in the 1990s, and the only

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Seed Harvest Update & River Stuff!

Save Maumee Seed Harvest 2010 Update:   Harvesters…the river thanks 30 of you, for all the seeds gathered for our 2nd Annual Seed Harvest at Fox Island.  Save Maumee is noteworthy of recognition for true improvements on your riverbanks (riparian areas) and continue to be the key word in today’s environmentalism…SUSTAINABLE!  WE could not do it without YOU.  We plucked the following and will plant our harvested seed at Earth Day 2011! ~ A grand plan in the works.  We will be sending a hard working group to a remote site at NOON on Sunday April 17th, 2011.  Save Maumee 6th Annual Earth Day begins at the usual spot at 11AM. Working on website updates right now.       What did we pluck from the generous nature preserve, Fox Island, and what will we be planting for Earth Day?  Estimates of seed weight and prices.   The following in blue is a price list from Heartland Restoration/Earth Source Inc. (2010 quotes)   Big Bluestem: $12/LB                            Save Maumee collected approx . 5.5 lbs = $66 Canada Wild Rye: $14/LB                      Save Maumee collected approx.  4.5 lbs = $63  Indian Grass: $8/LB                               Save Maumee collected approx.  3lbs = $

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Top Shoreline/Streambank Tips

1. Grow a Greenbelt: Establish a greenbelt or expand an existing one by adding more native plants.  Encourage your neighbors to do the same.  Buffers are helpful when it comes to water quality! 2. Fertilizer Smart: If you fertilize, refrain from fertilizing within 30′ of a shoreline/ditch/stream. DEFINITELY use no-phosphorus fertilizer. 3. Leave Trees: If a tree falls into the water leave it! They provide great habitat and contribute to the important carbon budget of the ecosystem. 4. Maintain Septic Systems: Failing septic systems can leach nutrients, which cause nuisance algae and plant growth. 5. Control Erosion: Stabilize shoreline erosion with bioengineering methods best management practices. 6. Join Forces: Support your local lake or river associations; they implement important resources protection projects and programs…like Save Maumee! 7. Stow Away: Store boats, boat hoists, docks and other equipment away from the shoreline; they can harm shoreline plants and compact soils.  Work on these machines and engines AWAY from the water to reduce leaks and spills. 8. Flow Away: Stormwater from driveways, roof tops, and other surfaces carries harmful pollutants.  Direct stormwater away from the street grates and allow it to infiltrate into the ground. (i.e. raingardens, rainbarrels, porous cement, wash car

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How does planting trees and grasses help?

     Siltation/erosion/sedimentation is the #1 pollutant in our watershed.  The grasses will help to settle out suspended sediment in the water to help hold down the soil that could be washed away because there is nothing to hold down the barren soil when the water comes rushing down during a rain event.        Grasses filtrate sediment by holding water for a longer period of time so the sediment settles to the bottom instead of traveling downstream.        Removal of nutrients from the water before it passes downstream.          Plants produce enzymes which will absorb and “eat” bacteria         Natural removal of chemical pollutants like fertilizers and waste materials removes nitrogen, phosphorous and toxins from surface water.         Creating more shade will help to create Dissolved Oxygen that is needed in the water for fish and other wildlife to “breathe.”         Floods problems can be alleviated – grassy knolls and trees can capture, store and slowly release water over a longer period of time         Protect shorelines through reduction of destructive energy from fast moving/ rising water         Alleviate pools of standing, stagnant water so West Nile will not have the opportunity to

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What to plant in yard, what NOT to plant?

Even though these plants are prohibited from being planted in natural areas or riverbanks, many of these plants are sold in nurseries to homeowners.  When planting the undesired foliage in our yard, they end up in natural areas and riverbanks.  The homeowners do not realize these plants are invasive.  Plants and trees are good…plants and trees that choke out diversity and natives are not so good.  Choose wisely! The following is a list: Scientific Name ~ Common Name ~ Why the tree or shrub is undesirable/invasive/susceptible to problems http://www.louisvilleky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/7BE8968C-8440-4002-8BAC-DA1206CBDD52/0/Appendix10BMarch06.pdf Fort Wayne and NE Indiana is Hardy Zone 4 – It is important to use plants adapted to our climate so they do not need to be watered after 1 year, because they will be watered naturally! This tells you many of the preferred trees http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/sheets/sustman.pdf (start at pg. 7 if you would like the LIST) The following is a well written article that explains and documents how “Foreign Plants and Animals Conquering Native Species” ~ Why to plant the preferred trees rather than others http://www.courier-journal.com/article/2010309270009 This is more information on WHY to plant natives (University of Minnesota) and includes” submerged plants -http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/components/DG7447a.html

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