Archive for the How Fort Wayne Category

MAP: Specific differentiation between Mississippi Basin & Great Lakes Basin

From the document: Wabash – Maumee Connection Site Visit Field Report July 27, 2010  Prepared For: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Great Lakes National Program Office  Click to access Wabash-Maumee-Field-Report_Final_small.pdf “Of primary concern are the Silver and Bighead carp which have been expanding their habitats within the Mississippi River basin for at least the past twenty years where they have decimated native fish populations by as much as 97 percent in some areas. These fish are currently threatening to enter the Great Lakes, a valuable fresh water resource.”   THIS is the specific location they are able to cross from the Mississippi via the Wabash to the Great Lakes via the St. Marys/Maumee. “Asian carp have been known to exist within the Wabash River for nearly 20 years. However, in May 2010 Indiana DNR observed Asian Carp eggs and spawning behavior much further upstream on the Wabash than was previously anticipated. The Wabash River was a “dead‐ end” for these fish as the Roush Dam prevents Asian carp from reaching the headwaters of the Wabash River. However, the Little River connects to the Wabash below the dam and its headwaters ebb into marshland on the southwestern edge of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Due

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Purdue Publication RE: Allen County/Indiana Watersheds

  8 pages of solid information CLICK HERE: Great Lakes Watershed / Allen County, Indiana  

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RiverFest at IPFW – Save Maumee Represented

Presentation: June 22, 2013  10:30AM – 11AM Title: What can we do to make our 3 Rivers better; In-depth thought into surface water Director, Abigail King said SMGO will release their new initiatives at RiverFest, that will “draw many eyes to the importance of water quality.” “We plan to demonstrate the symbiotic relationship between stream health and how it is directly related to human health and recreation.” By: Abigail King, Save Maumee Grassroots Organization Director & Founder Secretary of Heartland Communities Inc. (Save Maumee’s nonprofit 501C3 fiscal sponsor) Upper Maumee Watershed Partnership Treasurer Maumee Valley Heritage Corridor; Region I Environmental Consultant ACTIVE PRESENTATION FOR RIVERFEST ATTENDEES: Save Maumee Grassroots Organization will be passing out native riverbank seed & chaff in salvaged reusable cotton-cloth bags at RiverFest.  SMGO wants these diverse and desirable contents to be planted on any local streambank. Directions on the bag include, “if you want these seeds to grow, and work to improve water quality; only plant where nothing green grows, dirt is exposed, near an open water source, in an area that will NOT be mowed.  Then STOMP the seeds down flat with your shoes, flattening the open soil down, so it does not float away during

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IPFW Environmental Conservation Class-Field work with Save Maumee

Dr. Jordan Marshall – IPFW Environmental Conservation Class Monday October 15, 2012 1:30– 2:30pm Location: St. Joseph and St. Marys converge into the headwaters of the Maumee River – .7 miles downstream easterly Hosey Dam (at N. Anthony Bridge) North bank of the Maumee River; (floodway/spillway- direct middle) sand, loam, clay, river sediment NUMBER OF VOLUNTEER PARTICIPANTS – 24 Save Maumee Programing Project with IPFW Environmental Conservation Class In-kind student volunteers completed restoration project CLICK HERE FOR PICTURES In the floodway we planted 4 Pin Oak, 2 Mulberry, 2 River Birch, and one Hornbeam and 30 Oak Acorns into the stretch of river where Save Maumee conducts the majority of conservation projects.  As a group today, we also planted native DNR approved seeds; Big Blue Stem, Indian Grass, Switchgrass, New England Aster, Grass Leaved Goldenrod, Prairie Dock, Virginia Mountain Mint, Ironweed, Purple Coneflower, Monarda, and Black Eyed Susan and a few unidentified sedges.  We installed the seed blend under 19 feet of coconut mesh, called erosion-control-mats or GeoJute.  GeoJute is made from coconut fiber that will completely disintegrate in approximately 5 years. The coconut mesh is to hold down new life as the water raises and flows over the floodway. Dr.

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Celia Garza, Board Secretary

Where are all the trees? ~ It’s not JUST the Emerald ash borer destroying natural habitat. The Army Corp of Engineers follows the “Guidelines for landscape planting and vegetation management at levees, floodwalls, embankment dams and appurtenant structures (ETL 1110-2-571)” when deciding what trees and plants to remove [on levees]. Downtown Fort Wayne has 8 miles of “downtown river front development” and 10.5 miles of levees next to our rivers. If you have any questions or are concerned with the removal of our natural resources, trees and plants, please contact the following City of Fort Wayne and other government employees:   FORT WAYNE, INDIANA ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEER LEVEES (Detroit District) – CLICK MAP TO ENLARGE 10.5 miles are maintained by a non-federal agency/municipality = City of Fort Wayne Board of Public Works #1   Tina Kowitz, P.E Levee Safety Program Manager Geotech & Structures Branch U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District ph: (313) 226-6719 cell: (313) 244-6283 #2   Board of Public Works Bob Kennedy – Manager (260) 427-2693 Shan Gunawardena – Engineer (260) 427-1172 City of Fort Wayne Citizens Square Bldg. 2nd Floor (260) 427-1112 #3  Federal Senator Dan Coats Legislative Assistants: Paige Hallen Casey Murphy Kate Taylor 493 Russell

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HAPPENINGS!

  2013 Earth Day Flier EARTH DAY is Sunday April 21st from 11am-4pm Map here for all the FUN on Earth Day! Our social media outreach and updates have been sparse since my loving father AND our webguy, Brad Frost is very ill with cancer. FIND ALL THE INFO ABOUT EARTH DAY HERE! For more updates on a regular basis….check out our FACEBOOK! Call if you need anything or would like to participate! Abby 260.417.2500 EMAIL: Abby@SaveMaumee.Org

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Steering Committee Chair Discusses Levee Maintenance

Save Maumee wants to talk openly with city officials, and with the taxpayers, about our waterways and the cause & effect of current practices relating to land use and water quality. The water we speak of is the same water we drink, bathe our children in, water our gardens with, and live alongside. It is our greatest natural resource. Recently, the city hired a tree service to remove vegetation along the Niagara Levee (the same area Save Maumee has been repairing since 2005) for a levee inspection in December 2012. Conversations with Flood Control Supervisor Cathy Burleson revealed that the Army Corps of Engineers required much of this removal in their levee regulations that came as a result of Hurricane Katrina. She stated that she did not want to cut the trees down, ACE regulations required her to do so. Burleson also mentioned that there are 10.5 miles of levees that the City of Fort Wayne, Board of Public Works, are responsible for maintaining. Walk the River Greenway along Edgewater Avenue or Spy Run and you can see that definition of maintenance ~ removal of all trees and vegetation with the installation of rip rap. One small portion of Edgewater was developed

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Stewards of the Three Rivers of Fort Wayne

Abstract Stewards of the Three Rivers of Fort Wayne: By Rhonda Ladig Moxter The Interaction of Government, Quasigovernment, and Nonprofit Organizations In the pageant The Glorious Gateway of the West (Rice, 1916) celebrating the centennial of the state of Indiana, the prologue of the first scene discusses the magic that the three rivers of present day Fort Wayne meant to the native people.  In the prologue the pageant opens with a native musing, “Sacred this place.  For untold ages, long lost in the nameless years, my people came with ancient rites where these three rivers run under the shining sky” (p. 19).   Since the time before Fort Wayne was a city, with native peoples and settlers, the three rivers have been fought over as a source of food, water, transportation, business, and agriculture.  The battle over these rivers continues today, and the topics have changed surprisingly little.  But, though the circumstances have changed and the fight is just as passionate.  Many groups and organizations have an interest in the health and well-being of Fort Wayne’s three famous waterways.  Local government plays a huge role in the decisions over how the waters of our river can be used by businesses and

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Combined Sewer Overflows – college term paper

Combined Sewer Overflows   Written by Sean Musi V161    I have spent half of my life in Fort Wayne, Indiana and the number one issue that comes to mind involving the environment is the poor condition of our water ways. This is especially upsetting because the city seems to take some pride in the fact that three rivers meet in it and even have a large week-long festival named after it, Three Rivers.   ​My mind went straight to a presentation given by a local grassroots project while I was studying at my previous college in Fort Wayne. Abigail Frost, founder of Save Maumee Grassroots Movement, spoke about her current efforts as well as how these three bodies of water came to be as unpleasant as they are today.   ​The St. Joe River is where over 200,000 people get their drinking water. This meets the St. Mary’s and both then flow together to create the Maumee. The St. Mary’s, which floods frequently and is highly polluted, passes through much of northeast Indiana. These two rivers come together to form the Maumee, which contains high levels of mercury, PCB and E. coli.,fish consumption advisories, as well as the accumulation of sediment and garbage. The Maumee

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Save Maumee Grassroots Org. wins "Organization of the Year Award"

Awards Ceremony at The 4th Annual Greening the Statehouse Policy Forum will be held on Saturday, December 10th at Butler University’s Reilly Room at Atherton Union in downtown Indy from 8:30am-3pm.  So join us for education from Indianapolis policy experts and environmental groups. For reservations call Jesse Karbanda at 317.685.8800 ext. 103 The Hoosier Environmental Council, Indiana’s largest environmental policy organization, has claimed “Save Maumee won Organization of the Year!”  Abigail King, Ryan Bailey and Jain Young will be accepting the award for the group. Supporters of the day include Sierra Club, Blue Green Alliance, Carmel Green Initiative, Indiana Green Business Network, Indiana Recycling Coalition, Indiana Wildlife Federation, Save the Dunes, City of Indianapolis-Office of Sustainability. Save Maumee has been chosen as a result of the positive impact on the community, the group’s great volunteer spirit, passion for the health of the rivers in the Great Lakes region, and ability to organize a number of very successful volunteer driven river clean-up and restoration events. Northeast Indiana Rivers Represented in Washington D.C. Save Maumee has been chosen by Healing Our Waters to represent Northeast Indiana for Clean Water Week during Great Lakes Days in Washington, D.C. The event will be held

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River Network explains the Clean Water Act

 Currently, the Upper Maumee drains (the first half of the Maumee that headwaters in downtown Fort Wayne from Combined & Sanitary Sewer Overflows Rain and snowmelt discharged from combined stormwater and sewer systems can cause serious pollution in rivers and lakes in urban areas. These sewer systems were designed to capture and treat both domestic wastewater as well as stormwater runoff. But in many places development has increased beyond the capacity of combined sewer systems which causes them to periodically overflow, sending raw sewage into surface water bodies (combined sewer overflows). In areas where stormwater drains were never connected with the sanitary sewer system, raw sewage overflows can result from substantial amounts of water leaking into old pipes, pipe blockages, pipe breaks, power failures or insufficient capacity in the system. Such overflows are called sanitary sewer overflows. Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) are leading causes of water quality impairment across the country. The EPA states that only 32 percent of communities with CSOs are implementing the minimum controls, despite a January 1997 deadline. Only 19 percent have completed their plans for controlling CSOs, and fewer than 10 percent have finished implementing CSO controls. The EPA estimates

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IDEM Public Comment Letter for Steel Dynamics Inc. new copper plant

September 19, 2011 This letter is to be included for the public comment period on SDI LaFarga, LLC’s air permit #003-30250-00384 We believe there is a compliance violation with Steel Dynamics’ operation at Superior Aluminum located on 14214 Edgerton rd. (326 IAC 6-4 Rule on Fugitive Dust).  We can provide video evidence to both the EPA and IDEM to prove the need for an investigation.  IDEM referred us to information about current and expected air pollution levels at http://www.in.gov/apps/idem/smog/ and directed us towards a map of the air quality monitors around the area. After digging for a time, I was unable to locate a map that showed anything but the monitors around nation. It is difficult to tell if the ones in our area are located in Allen County, IN.  Our area of concern is around Edgerton, Ryan, Dawkins, Bruick, Harper, Roussey, Bremer, Berthauld, Webster, Parent, Slusher Roads, and US 24.   In the 326 IAC 2-1.1-5 it reads. The commissioner shall not issue a registration, permit, modification approval, or operating permit revision: (1)   would allow a source to cause or contribute to a violation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards; (2)   would allow a violation of a PSD

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Steel Dynamics Inc. MEETING for Building Copper Foundry in New Haven

On April 27, Steel Dynamics Inc. held an open meeting to discuss its plan for a new copper foundry to be built in New Haven, IN.  It began with a short presentation about the site, giving details of the furnace, what routes trucks would use and so on.  Afterwards, they opened the floor for questions.  Although only a few were informed of this meeting in advance, over 150 residents came to voice their concerns over the pollution this plant will likely produce. SDI, together with OMNI Source, has run Superior Aluminum since 1998, and has many of its neighbors worried.  In April of 2010, a leak of chlorine gas forced those nearby to evacuate their homes for several days while the haz-mat was cleaned up: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKcjqH26DoM.  At the meeting, questions were asked about the day to day problems, like noxious odors, and blue smoke blowing for miles around the plant.  One man even had video footage of this, but the members of the board refused to acknowledge these claims.  Instead of attempting to answer the concerns, or giving detail how their new plant would be different then their old one, they pled ignorance of the environmental issues at hand, and

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6th Annual Save Maumee's EARTH DAY FUNNY VIDEO!

Well, we are considered a good natured bunch, with a sense of humor… See our attempts at getting some nationwide attention!  We gave a funny shout out to Ellen DeGeneres, John Stewart, Jimmy Kimmel, Steven Colbert & Oprah.  We figured any media attention is good attention, even if it is a little tainted!  We think that all the trash we pull out of our Three Rivers in Fort Wayne is ridiculous and wanted to share a little satire in our Earth Day efforts.  We have been accused of being “rough around the edges and a little crass,” so we did not want to disappoint!  Remember, we are a 100% unpaid volunteer group, so you get what you pay for!  Dirty rivers, however, are no laughing matter.  Let it be very clear though, we only want clean water, clean rivers and reduced pollution and we are willing to do something about it.  It is one thing that brings us all to a consensus.  Thank you for your continued support! Thank you to everyone who make our events a complete success….AGAIN! The first 30 seconds are specific to the celebrity, and the rest of the 2 minute video are basically the same.

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More Trees Removed Along Riverbanks?

VIDEO AND COVERAGE HERE: Levee Tree Removal in Fort Wayne It has recently come to the attention of Save Maumee that trees along the Maumee River and St. Mary’s River are indiscriminately being cut down by order of the Board of Public Works by orders of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  Apparently, this area of the riverbank lies on a levee and during one of the last big floods in Fort Wayne, the riverbank and the trees fell into the water.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is in charge of regulating levees by setting the safety guidelines and according to city planners, the US ACE directed the city to “remove the trees and make repairs or lose the acceptable rating of flood protection.”  This has resulted in the removal of hundreds of trees along the riverbanks of the Maumee River – in addition to trees removed from the St. Mary’s and St. Joe Rivers as well. Straight from the Board Of Public Works “Officials in Fort Wayne say there should be no trees cut down along the city’s flood levees because there aren’t any. The levees here were built by the corps in the 1990s, and the only

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Save Maumee's 3rd Annual ~ Canoe Clean-Up, Can YOU Clean-Up? Update

3rd Annual Update to Save Maumee’s Canoe Clean Up, Can YOU Clean-Up? ~Underbelly of the St. Mary’s River Uncovered~ What an interesting day THANK YOU to all Save Maumee’s 60 energetic river workers! Police, a meth amphetamine lab, batteries, full fire extinguisher & spray paint, Kids Dart, Think Smart yard sign, a sink, metal car parts, a carpeted wooden box with incubator like dials attached, 2 wallets complete with driver’s licenses, full size dead cat, Pepsi can from the 1970’s, a Cookie Monster hat, thousands of cans/bottles/Styrofoam and cigarette butts, and of course plenty of tampons and fresh water jellyfish to finish the day. We also installed 40 square feet of erosion control mats to keep soil where it belongs.   Many questions arose as to where all the fresh water jellyfish came from…a.k.a. condoms.  Local citizens flush them down the toilet, the combined sewer systems then flush them to the river with as little as 1/10th inch of rainfall.  They are not from extracurricular activities on the rivers! Remember, what you flush down your toilets and sinks DO NOT go away, they end up in our rivers.  To clarify questions asked about Combined Sewer Overflows please read the Save

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Being Cordial to an Urgent issue – Maplecrest Extension Bridge

It is ludicrous to the way that our rivers are treated.  I must speak my mind today because enforcement should be on every voters lips.  The most recent issue is the Maplecrest road extension to new SR 24 and related erosion problems. I was sent an email August 9th by a fisherman that had stumbled upon the Maplecrest bridge project.  He told me that he was angered by the construction workers at the site and their littering along the banks.  He felt concerned they were not cleaning up their trash.  Here is the video he sent me… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHIGTQMeHyE Upon viewing the footage, I noticed not the trash, but the EROSION! Our approximate 200ft wide river was reduced to a trickle of its former Maumee girth.  It appeared that the construction company had no erosion control techniques in place thus causing accelerated erosion. Construction permits must include erosion control techniques – ESPECIALLY when building on a floodplain!  So I took the next step and contacted the Allen County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) and requested an inspection for the site. SWCD came to the site, reporting there were zero erosion control techniques in place and then approached the Allen County

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Day at the Maumee Bay / Lake Erie

The following is information the Erie Port Authority passed out to participants attending “A Day at the Bay” hosted by the  Upper Maumee Watershed Partnership.  Maumee River: Largest body of water emptying into the Great Lakes 150 miles long Shares water with the St. Marys River, St. Joseph River, Auglaize River, Little Auglaize River, Blanchard River, Tiffen River, Ottowa River Maumee Watershed: 6,586 sqare miles in Indiana, Ohio & Michigan 4,000 miles of streams Drains 4 million acres 1.7 million people live in the watershed 327 named streams Supports 94 species of fish 90% of Ohio’s wetlands have been drained or filled in

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Great Lakes states’ 500 square miles of parking lots threaten water quality, walkability

http://greatlakesecho.org/2010/06/17/great-lakes-states-500-square-miles-of-parking-lots-threaten-water-quality-walkability/       Great Lakes Echo –  June 17, 2010 People ask me all the time about CSO’s / SSO’s (Combined  Sewer Overflow / Sanitary Sewer Outfalls).  Did the city plan poorly for our sewers? Why would 1/12th of an inch of rain cause all of our toilets and sinks water and stormsewers mix and discharge directly into the rivers, if the city/county were not to blame?  The answer is not that complicated like many others these days.  However, solutions are very expensive. When Fort Wayne infrastructure was built around 1912 for our sanitary sewers (toilets) and stormsewers (the grates on the streets) they were two separate systems that were connected, toward the top, by a single pipe.  The sanitary sewers have a constant flow, the storm sewers surge with rain.  Since they are connected at the top with a smaller pipe, the mix of both pipes are released from the “outfall points.”  This pipe is a fail-safe type system, so when large rain events or flooding occurred, it would discharge into the waterways instead of coming up in your house.  This is not a bad idea, considering I am a homeowner as well.  SO ~ when built all those many years

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